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Matthew 27:11 Pilate

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Pilate

Pilate was the Roman Governor of Israel. He had jurisdiction over all of Israel which included sentencing Jesus to die on the cross.

This is a Bible Study. Have your own Bible handy to look up the references mentioned.

If you do not have a Bible, I invite you to go to BibleGateway.com or another online Bible.

Matthew 27:11-30

11. “Yes, Jesus is the King of the Jews, but not in the way Pilate fears (cf. John 18:36-37). Jesus has committed no crime against Rome.” (Blomberg, Craig L., The New American Commentary, Volume 22, Matthew. [Nashville: Broadman Press], 410)

12. “Pilate is amazed that Jesus refuses to defend himself.” (Blomberg, 410)

13. “Jesus explained to the governor that His kingdom was not of this world, that He had no armies, that His followers did not fight. Rather His kingdom was a reign of truth.” (John 18:36) (Wiersbe, Warren W, The Bible Exposition Commentary New Testament Volume 1 Matthew-Galatians. [Colorado Springs: David C Cook, 2004], 100)

14. “He was the Lamb of God, you see, who before the shearers was dumb (see Isaiah 53:7).” (McGee, J. Vernon, Thru the Bible: Volume IV. [Nashville: Thomas Nelson, 1983], 146)

Barabbas

15. “It was customary for amnesty to be granted a prisoner at Passover. In an attempt to remove from himself the responsibility for dealing with Jesus, Pilate sought to get rid of Jesus.” (The Moody Bible Commentary, The Moody Bible Institute of Chicago, [Moody Publishers, Chicago, IL, 2014], 1510)

16. “Pilate expects the crowd to opt for Jesus, especially when the only other apparent candidate for release is a man named Barabbas, who was particularly ‘notorious.’” (Blomberg, 410)

17. “Pilate reasoned that the crowd would reject Barabbas and ask for Jesus to be released, for who wants a convicted murdered and robber turned loose into society?” (Wiersbe, 100)

18. “Pilate had no love for the Jewish leaders. He may have wanted Jesus’ innocence established to spite the Jewish leaders. So Pilate bypassed the leaders and went straight to the people.” [Max Anders and Stuart K. Weber (2012). HNTC Vol. 01: Matthew. B&H Publishing Group. Retrieved from https://read.lifeway.com]

19. “I do not believe that this warning came from God. She was simply superstitious and asked her husband to have nothing to do with Him.” (McGee, J. Vernon, Thru the Bible: Volume IV. [Nashville: Thomas Nelson, 1983], 146)

20. “The Jewish leaders stir up the crowd, perhaps against its natural preference.” (Blomberg, 412)

21. “Pilate was taken aback. He had not known how low religion would stoop.” (McGee, 146)

22. “When we analyze this mock trail, we come to the conclusion that Pilate was the one on trial and, actually, that Jesus was the Judge.” (McGee, 146)

23. “This is no time for rational discourse, only mass hysteria. The crowd clamors ever more wildly for Jesus’ crucifixion.” (Blomberg, 412)

Blood of Jesus

24. “Although Pilate washed his hand, the bitter irony of it is that in the oldest creed of the church stand these words: ‘ crucified under Pontius Pilate.’ The blood of Jesus was on his hands no matter how much he washed them.” (McGee, 147)

25. The crowd’s “cry picks up on Pilate’s reference to ‘blood,’ and they accept responsibility for Jesus’ death.” (Blomberg, 413)

26.” Pilate released Barabbas to return to his life of crime. Then contrasted the freed villain with the innocent man. Jesus was flogged. This was a shredding of the victim’s back by repeated blows with a whip, made of leather thongs imbedded with sharp bits of metal or bone.” [Max Anders and Stuart K. Weber (2012). HNTC Vol. 01: Matthew. B&H Publishing Group. Retrieved from https://read.lifeway.com]

27. “The soldiers were free to do with Him as they pleased. He became a plaything for this brutal, cruel, crowd.” (McGee, 147)

28. “The soldiers disrobed Jesus and dressed Him in an old ‘soldier’s cloak.’ Image attiring the Prince of Peace (Isa. 9:6) in a discarded military uniform!” (Wiersbe,  101)

29. “A king must have a crown, so they wove together the thorny twigs of a plant and pushed it on His head.” (Wiersbe, 101)

30. “Jesus took all of this humiliation and pain without speaking or fighting back (1 Peter 2:18ff). His submission was not a sign of weakness; it was a sign of strength.” (Wiersbe, 101)

References

Holman Christian Standard Bible (HCSB)
Copyright © 1999, 2000, 2002, 2003, 2009 by Holman Bible Publishers, Nashville Tennessee. All rights reserved.

New American Standard Bible (NASB)
New American Standard Bible®, Copyright © 1960, 1971, 1977, 1995, 2020 by The Lockman Foundation. All rights reserved.

New King James Version (NKJV)
Scripture taken from the New King James Version®. Copyright © 1982 by Thomas Nelson. Used by permission. All rights reserved.

In this article Scripture quotations taken from KJV.

Blomberg, Craig L., The New American Commentary, Volume 22, Matthew. Nashville: Broadman Press
McGee, J. Vernon, Thru the Bible: Volume IV. Nashville: Thomas Nelson, 1983
The Moody Bible Commentary, The Moody Bible Institute of Chicago, Moody Publishers, Chicago, IL, 2014
Robertson, A. T., A Harmony of the Gospels. New York, HarperCollins Publishers
Wiersbe, Warren W, The Bible Exposition Commentary New Testament Volume 1 Matthew-Galatians. Colorado Springs: David C Cook, 2004

 

Judas                                                                                                       Crucifixion

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